Creating A Walking Bass Line On Piano (Beginners)

Playing A Walking Bass Line On PianoWhen you know how to play a walking bass line on piano at any given time, you are in possession of a shining tool that you are sure to keep at the very top of that piano playing toolbox of yours. Unfortunately, far too many pianists never attempt them and only marvel at the ability of other pianists who have a handle on this very useful cocktail piano playing technique.

Walking a bass line on piano can be accomplished on many levels. There are certainly concepts that are more advanced than others. But you have to start somewhere! Great news follows: you see, it’s not necessary to have those more advanced skills under your fingertips in order to put your playing across in a very professional way. Remember this: It’s not necessarily WHAT you know but how you use what you know.

Are you familiar with playing simple triads on the piano, for example? That in its own right lends itself to your creating effective bass lines for a beginner. Playing a basic triad in an arpeggiated manner works marvelously well.

A main point that I would like to get across here is that you want to connect yourself with a musical idea that allows you to play with some momentum without distraction. In other words, if you have your left hand fingering a C Major triad in the bass area, it’s just a matter of playing those keys as quarter notes, one at a time. You are not distracted by the act of having to look for them. Once you get your momentum going with a simple technique such as this one, it becomes easier to graduate to turning that idea into a more interesting line. Master what comes easy to you. Then more creativity can blossom from there.

(excerpt from this very popular online video session)

When you consider what a bass player will often resort to while walking, it makes sense that focusing on those chord tones is conducive to nice lines developing. A professional bass player, although capable of playing more complex lines, will often gravitate back to these chord tones, often using the  1 and 5 of the chord (for C Major: C>>G>>C, etc).

If you are familiar with 7th chords, then you can feel free to play those 7th chords as arpeggios as well, trading off between them and just the triads.

As you begin to feel confident with playing these “broken” chords, you’ll want to insert “neighbor” tones in between them to make your lines more interesting.

A key point worth mentioning is that, however you play those walking bass lines on piano, keep it in perspective. Remember the role of those lines. They are serving as support and accompaniment to a melody or improvisation which takes priority. So, focus on maintaining a balance with your volume. That left side of the piano will naturally resound more intensely, so play with sensitivity by playing those walking bass lines on the softer side. Their importance will stand on their own without being accentuated with extra volume.

There is much more that can be said of playing walking bass lines on piano but this short lesson is intended to serve as a beginning from which you can spring from.

Enjoy the walk!

ProProach: Exploring Piano Chord Voicings

Jazz Piano Chord Voicings & More

A Message Of Gratitude

Jazz Piano Chord VoicingsI would like to express my heartfelt thanks to the many recent positive comments I have been receiving from participants of this popular piano chord voicings program. I often reflect on the moments of creation of ProProach and, whenever I do, I experience great feelings, as the energy that went into it was a manifestation of a desire to convey to others a simple, step-by-step procedure for others to enjoy many of the “tricks of the trade” in a fashion that was not only easy to understand but easy to implement. I’m so happy to continue to be able to report that people worldwide are enjoying its benefits.

Another thing I would like to express gratitude for is the devotion to those who have subscribed to the concept of learning and digesting one lesson at a time. Yes, I do completely understand the initial inclination to want to have all the lessons at once. But, time and time again, people who take advantage of this chord voicings program and use it in the manner in which it was originally intended are realizing the true value of following along this way. To those who have yet to enroll in ProProach, please know that, upon completion of the 25 lessons, you will indeed have access to all the lessons from one place because it is my desire that you continuously put into practice these lessons again and again. Individuals who take themselves through the 25 lessons more than once always experience benefits well beyond those gained from just one time. This continues to be confirmed by actual members who do so.

To those considering enrolling in the program, I would like to offer the suggestion that you use Lesson #1 and Lesson #2 in conjunction with each other, as they are very much related. Spend at least a week with these lessons and apply them to the various keys (Cmaj9, Fmaj9, Bbmaj9, Dmin9, Gmin9, Amin9, etc). The satisfaction gained by doing so is huge, not to mention the confidence that you’ll begin to enjoy.

In addition, I would encourage you to enjoy these lessons with an attitude of curiosity. Have fun with them as a child might have fun with a set of finger paints. The many “colors” that you are capable of creating are unlimited and, as you continue to experience one lesson after another, you’ll see this for yourself. Furthermore, if you decide to enroll in Pro Piano Chord Bytes (also a 24-week program) at the same time, you’ll experience something rather unique, as the two programs are extremely compatible with each other. ProProach does include a complimentary video with each lesson; for reasons aligned with taking personal creative initiative, Pro Piano Chord Bytes does not. In short, enroll and implement the strategies of both programs with enthusiasm and curiosity, and your results will be nothing short of astounding.

Piano Chord Voicings Explored

ProProach Piano Chord Voicings Program: What Makes It So Effective?

Popular Chord Voicings ProgramChord voicings is the name of the game with ProProach. Now, in this message, I would like to acknowledge  a question received a number of times regarding how this popular piano chord program is presented. Here it is:

“Can I receive all the lessons in ProProach at one time?”

The perceived “benefit” of having all the lessons at one’s fingertips from the perspective of the person asking the question is understandable. It’s human nature to want to “browse” and “pick and choose” certain favorite chord voicings to play with and experience instantly.

Is there anything wrong with that? Of course not. However, it ought to be pointed out that much of the true effectiveness of ProProach can be credited to the gradual implementation of new voicings as they are learned. Actually, the very same individuals who ask the question above are the folks who, upon exposing themselves to the program, are kind enough to write me and let me know that it is this very approach to learning which is responsible for the gained confidence they enjoy as growing piano stylists.

That said, the truth is that you actually do get to have the entire collection of lessons and video demonstrations at your fingertips once you’ve taken yourself through the program. Time and time again, members have notified me that this has become especially invaluable to the even more so because they followed the program as suggested.  The reason? Well, once ProProach has been enjoyed the way it’s been intended, going through the program offers a different perspective each time. Truly, this is a piano chord voicings program that you can grow with.

Even the very first lesson of the program (which is currently being offered for free on the main site) can be taken to many different levels. My video session in Cocktail Piano Secrets #1 helps one do just that. If you’d like to get a handle on a nice way to create some tasteful harmonic piano fills, that program is one I hope you will consider.

I am always happy to communicate with people who have taken the leap and taken advantage of this program, as the fun I had in creating it is matched only by the satisfaction I personally get when a ProProach member emails me with a message similar to the many testimonials you will find on the site. I am inspired by your progress!

Remember,

Always…

ALWAYS…

PLAY WITH PASSION!

Musically,

Dave
www.PianoAmore.net
www.ProProach.com

Piano Improvisation: Melodic Embellishment

Piano improvisation - embellish melodyMelodic embellishment is the one aspect of piano improvisation that lends itself to your sounding “pro” very quickly, considering how little effort is needed on your part. What you do need is to resolve to have some fun with a few very easy concepts. Impressive results tend to manifest faster than you might expect.

There are many aspects of piano improvisation that can serve as great approaches to effectively embellishing a melody. There is one technique that I particularly like for beginners that is conducive to great sounding melodic embellishments. What is it? Well, it involves the use of the blues scale. It should be pointed out and emphasized here that knowing the blues scale as most people do is one thing. However, using it to create tasteful piano fills is another.

There is the common tendency for beginning piano improvisers to overuse the blues scale and thus sound rather “robotic.” But this will improve with experience and maturity. In addition, this “learning curve” can be reduced dramatically when utilizing the blues scale in a fashion that is proven to be effective right from the beginning. This is a topic that is a favorite of mine so I actually created a video session dedicated to helping learning improvisers and piano stylists to get a handle on this special, easy-to-grasp improvising technique. The title of the session can be rather deceiving since it can lead one to believe that it is dedicated to learning blues piano exclusively. This is far from the truth. The video session actually shows example of how you can tastefully utilize the blues scale to create some very interesting piano embellishments when playing standard songs.

The name of the session is 5 Blues Piano Licks You Just Gotta Know and it can be accessed online instantly. It’s rather amazing how just using a simple strategy in such a subtle way can really make you come across as a player who “stands above the crowd.” The reason is simple: when you play something that sounds as if it was produced in an effortless fashion, the listener picks up on that.

Try A Little Piano Improvisation

Here is a little piano improvisation experiment you can have fun with. You are highly encouraged to take a standard song that you are confident when it comes to playing it. Now, locate the end of a phrase that is inactive. Specifically, I am referring to an area in the melody that includes a note with a duration of at least 3 beats (dotted half note or more). Next, play that entire melodic phrase and, right after you’ve played that note, instead of holding it to its fullest extent (3 beats or more), play a couple of notes from that melody in an effort to “echo” a portion of what’s been played.

Don’t be concerned with your choices. Don’t overthink this. Rather, adopt a very accepting attitude of yourself and your efforts. This is key. You see, when you are confident, your audience knows it. So practice confidence when you are playing alone. You’ll find that, before long, this confidence becomes transferred when you are actually playing for others!

Remember,

Always…

ALWAYS…

PLAY WITH PASSION!

Musically,

Dave
www.PianoAmore.net
www.ProProach.com

 

Great Sound Piano Chords: Your Very Own?

Great-Sounding-Piano-ChordsWhen you hear the same tune being played by a number of different players, it’s pretty easy to determine which of those players have a real handle on what they are doing in terms of harmony. It doesn’t take much effort to recognize when great sounding piano chords are being played.

But what do we mean by great sounding piano chords?

Some beginning players who have a handle on those basic chords, including triads and 7th chords, might be thinking, “But I learned all these chords. If I know them all, isn’t this all there is to know?” Often, it’s these same individuals who will put on a recording of a pianist like Bill Evans and, after listening to just a few measures of a song they are familiar with, will admit that there’s some kind of “magic” going on that they can’t seem to put their finger on.

So, what’s the secret to playing great sounding piano chords?

Voicings.

That’s right. An understanding of piano voicings is what “separates the men from the boys” when it comes to piano styling. It’s one thing to know what a G7 chord is and playing it is not really a challenge. But when you play it in the basic manner that most initially learn it, that “magic” doesn’t seem to manifest.

However, an understanding of the many ways that G7 chord can be voiced leads you down a different road – a path worth exploring. The good news is you don’t have to know everything about piano voicings to gain benefit from them. Actually, you can start enjoying benefits as soon as you learn one or two and decide to implement them by incorporating them in your favorite songs.

Two programs that are highly recommended (if you truly want to start having fun with piano voicings) are ProProach and Pro Piano Chord Bytes. The first is a 24-week program in which a new lesson is sent to your email box each week. Basically how this works is you learn one new voicing and use it to the point of being confident with it in the context of your favorite songs… then you learn a new one, and the process of development continues. Once you accumulate all the lessons, you can continue enjoying them indefinitely. Actually, some of the major benefits gained are reported from users of ProProach who have taken themselves through the program more than once (this one’s unique, folks). The lessons consist of textual explanations and videos that support the content. A great feature of this one is that you not only learn how to play those special chord sounds of the pros but you also learn how to apply them in your favorite tunes.

Pro Piano Chord Bytes is another weekly program that is also delivered to your email box. This one does not consist of videos. Rather it provides you with one approach to voicing a chord per week and also consist of commentary that leads you to think for yourself so that you are encouraged to create your very own chord voicings.

What happens when you combine these programs as part of a “balanced diet of musical nutrition?” In short, your confidence when it comes to playing those “chord sounds of the pros” soars like never before.

Get involved with making an exploration of piano voicings an important part of your musical journey and you’ll soon wonder where the time has gone and why you didn’t know this stuff before. But don’t fret. There’s no time like the present. Give yourself the opportunity to explore your musical potential with piano voicings and remember…

Always…

ALWAYS…

PLAY WITH PASSION!

Musically,

Dave
www.PianoAmore.net
www.ProProach.com

Cocktail Piano Chords: Opening Up Those Triads

Cocktail-Piano-ChordsWhen it comes to playing cocktail piano chords that are the among the easiest to play while being extremely effective, what we’ll be looking at here will rate high on the list. If you know how to play some simple triads (three-note chords), this will come easy to you. In addition, you’ll discover for yourself that, even if you don’t have a specific tune in mind, you can compliment a nice ambience with these cocktail piano chords when played subtlety and legato.

Again, we’re using simple triads here. For our example, we will look at the C Major triad in Root Position, 1st Inversion, and 2nd Inversion  in their closed postions:

Cocktail-Piano-Chords

By simply opening up these triads and playing them in their open positions, we arrive at some very nice textures. When supported with the use of the sustain pedal, sometimes played as we see below and other times played in a arpeggiated fashion, you can easily grab a listener’s ear with very sparse playing…

Cocktail-Piano-Chords

If the concept of “opening” a chord is new to you, we are simply taking the middle chord tone of each position in our first illustration above and playing it one octave higher. Yes, two hands will be used, and this particular example that we just illustrated can be easily fingered with the right hand by simply fingering a Cmaj in 1st inversion (while allowing the left hand to take care of everything else). Doing so places your right hand fingers within easy grasp of E, G and C as they are played subsequently, as shown above.

Once you are comfortable with playing our example above in open positions, consider playing through a chord progression using these open positions. Doing so will accomplish at least two things: 1) Your confidence with playing triads in open positions will rise tremendously; 2) You’ll be playing something that sounds quite nice when taking those open positions through, say, a I – vii – ii – V chord progression like Cmaj – Amin – Dmin – Gmaj.

Please consider putting the above suggestion to use in addition to understanding it intellectually. Actually take yourself through the three positions over each chord in that chord progressions. You’ll automatically have, at your fingertips, twelve interesting chord textures you can feel good about adding to that “piano playing toolbox” of yours.

Next, take yourself through an entire favorite song of yours and simply play the chords in their open position inversions as if you were accompanying yourself while singing the melody. Experiment with different inversions as you play through the chord changes of the song again and again. Watch your confidence with playing cocktail piano chords grow!

Remember,

Always…

ALWAYS…

PLAY WITH PASSION!

Musically,

Dave
www.PianoAmore.net
www.ProProach.com

Jazz Piano Chords: Quartal Voicings

Jazz-Piano-ChordsYour repertoire of jazz piano chords will undoubtedly include the exploration of quartal voicings if you are sincere in your interest in this art form. There is much to share when it comes to quartal voicings and we do acknowledge them in ProProach, too. Here we will look at one voicing in particular…
Quartal voicings are chord structures that are built using perfect 4th intervals. Let’s look at a quartal voicing that can be used for both major and minor chords. Suppose we had a melody note of C that was to be harmonized with with a C Major 7th or Major 6th chord.
Well if we start from that melody note and work our way down in perfect 4ths, we would have this:

C  G  D  A  E

Notice that there is a perfect 4th interval between each of the subsequent notes in this chord voicing. In relation to C Major chord, we have, from bottom to top this time:

E  A  D  G  C
3  6   9   5  1

Notice that we have no 7th chord in this chord voicing. However, it can often be used even when a Major 7th chord is called for. The 6 and 9 of this chord add nice flavor. In addition, the fact that the voicing consists of perfect 4ths makes for a more contemporary sound.

Now, let’s suppose that, with the same melody note (C), the chord asked for is an Amin7. Well, this voicing can still work. Yes, this is one of those jazz piano chords that has versatility! In relation to A minor, we have from bottom to top:

5  1  11  7  3 (the 11 is also the 4th)

Go ahead and play each of these voicings and, just before you play each, play the root in the bass area with the sustain pedal followed by the voicing. Do this with the C in the bass and then with the A and listen.

Is it necessary to play that root in the bass area with these voicings? No, but doing so will give you that extra substance or “bottom” when you’re looking for it, especially when playing those ballads as a soloist.

Since this chord voicing is built simply using perfect 4ths, it will be relatively easy to transpose this one to other keys. You are highly encouraged to do this.

Are you seeing how learning voicings of various textures is really conducive to your being a more mature stylist at those ivories? The more textures you learn , the more diversity you have.

Have fun with quartal voicings!

Remember,

Always…

ALWAYS…

PLAY WITH PASSION!

Musically,

Dave
www.PianoAmore.net
www.ProProach.com

Piano Scales: The Lydian Mode

Piano-ScalesOne of the piano scales enjoyed by the pros as an alternative to the major scale as most of us know it will be acknowledged here. This scale really can add some “juice” while improvising over those major 7th chords. What’s great, too, is if you’re already familiar with the traditional major scale, you’ll find this one easy to get used to.

The scale being referred to here is the Lydian mode. Let’s investigate…

We’ll start by illustrating the traditional major scale. The C Major scale will be used here:

C  D  E  F  G  A  B  C
1   2  3  4   5  6   7  1

We have the foundation we need here. Look at the 4th degree of the scale. In this case, it is the F. Okay, play the C Major scale starting and ending on this note, as we have illustrated here:

F  G  A  B  C  D  E  F

Here we have the F Lydian scale (or mode). Again, this is one of those piano scales that you will use for added flavor when playing those major 7th chords. Let’s listen to this scale as you play it with your right hand while playing an Fmaj7 chord with your left.

You will notice that this scale varies from the traditional F Major scale in only one respect – that 4th of the scale is raised (the B is not flat in this case). So, an easy way to arrive at a Locrian scale is to play the traditional major scale that starts on the same root and simply raise the 4th degree a half step.

Play that scale again while playing the chord with your left hand. This time, pay particular attention to how that B natural sounds with the chord. How does it sound to you? However you describe this is right for you. Perhaps you might say that the raised 4th makes for a bit of a “mysterious” kind of effect.

An interesting characteristic of the Lydian mode is that there are no avoid notes. An “avoid” note is considered to be a tone in the scale that doesn’t really sound all that wonderful when held for a long duration while playing the chord. To confirm this for yourself, play the chord with your left hand and slowly play the traditional F Major scale (F  G  A  Bb  C  D  E  F). Notice that, when you arrive at the Bb, there is a certain dissonance that you may not consider all that pleasing to the ear. Next, play the Lydian mode (with that B natural) and listen to the difference!

Please consider exploring this very popular Lydian mode in other keys, too. You’ll find that it will very likely become one of your favorites!

Remember,

Always…

ALWAYS…

PLAY WITH PASSION!

Musically,

Dave
www.PianoAmore.net
www.ProProach.com

Piano Improvisation Tips: Use Those “Other” Notes

Piano-Improvisation-TipsOne of the best piano improvisation tips that I ever had been exposed to was that of “going outside the chord.” I mean, when most of us first learn to improvise, we are encouraged to utilize the actual chord tones of the chord we are playing. By the way, this is good advice. That said, you can add even more dimension to your use of those chord tones when you consider using those “other” notes.

What is being referred to here? Okay, let’s take a look at a Gmin7 chord. In it’s basic root position, this chord is spelled as follows:

G  Bb  D  F
1    3    5  7

When playing a Gmin7 chord, it makes perfect sense that these chord tones are compatible for improvising. You can even come up with some pretty interesting improvisational ideas simply adhering to these chord tones.

If you have limited yourself to improvising in this fashion, then this will be one of the most eye-opening (and ear-opening) piano improvisation tips you’ve stumbled upon yet. It’s pretty easy to grasp, too. When you play the Gmin7 chord above, the notes once again are:

G  Bb  D  F

Let’s consider a chord/scale relationship here. This Gmin7 chord can be thought of as being related to a G Dorian scale (or mode), which looks like this:

G  A  Bb  C  D  E  F  G

Notice the chord tones of the Gmin7 highlighted in red above. Now, look at those other tones that are in between those chord tones. What are they? Yes, those “other” notes are A, C, and E. We could even included the top G again and have A, C, E, and G. Question: what chord do those tones spell?

Right! It’s an Amin7…

Now, go ahead and play a Gmin7 chord with your left hand. While doing this, play those Amin7 chord tones one at a time. Come up with some melodic ideas using those Amin7 chord tones. You’re sure to come up with some pretty interesting improvisational ideas!

Okay, now continue to do this and then have your improvisation resolve to the actual chord tones of Gmin7. One example might look like this: Piano-Improvisation-Tips Notice that the first four eighth notes are simply those “other” notes… yes, the chord tones from Amin7… and the following four eighth notes consist of only chord tones from Gmin7.

Suggestion: using this as a guideline, create some of your own improvisations over the Gmin7 chord. Feel free to add your own “twist” to the idea you see above. Mix up those chord tones. Your possibilities are endless!

Also, apply this improvisation concept to some other chords. You are just beginning to explore your creative, musical potential!

Remember,

Always…

ALWAYS…

PLAY WITH PASSION!

Musically,

Dave
www.PianoAmore.net
www.ProProach.com

PS Want some more piano improvisation tips? Visit here

Cocktail Piano Chords: Open Voicing and Then Some…

Cocktail-Piano-ChordsOur focus on cocktail piano chords has included some attention on open chord voicings. As a review, let’s consider one way we can open up a chord like a Major 7th. We’ll use Fmaj7 for our example. This chord, in its most basic form (root position) is spelled like this:

F  A  C  E
1  3  5  7

This chord is considered to be in “closed” position since the chord tones are as close to each other as they can possibly be. In other words, there are no chord tones between the F and A, the A and C, or the C an E.

Well, we can open this chord by playing a 1-5-7-3 voicing, which looks like this:

Cocktail-Piano-ChordsPlay this chord voicing as it illustrated above and listen. Just the way it is here, we have one of the most popular cocktail piano chords played by the pros. You’ll notice that the chord has all four of the basic chord tones, so it is complete as it is. That said, let’s make it a little “fuller” by doubling the root and playing it in between the 3 and 7. We will leave the 1 and 5 “open”. Our result looks like this:

Cocktail-Piano-ChordsPlay this new chord voicing as we have illustrated it and listen. Then compare the one preceding it by playing them both back and forth. It’s interesting how making one simple modification can change the texture of the voicing we are playing.

How could we use this? Well, to illustrate, we will use an excerpt from the very popular Pro Piano Chord Bytes (a 24 week online subscription that can change the way you think about playing chords). Let’s say that we are playing the beginning of Hoagy Carmichael’s and Mitchell Parish’s Stardust. If you look at the melody, you’ll notice that it is the 6th of the chord. Well, a very tasteful way of filling this up would be to use the Major 7th voicing that we just took a look at. The entire voicing may be played below that melody note.

Here is the excerpt from Pro Piano Chord Bytes that illustrates doing exactly that:

Cocktail-Piano-Chords

Play this chord voicing in the context of this melody and notice the richness that results!

You are highly encouraged to transpose this voicing into other keys. Doing so will have you feeling so much more confident when you’re looking to get a nice full sound on those major chords. Of course, you will gain more value by actually incorporating the voicing in favorite standard songs of yours!

Remember,

Always…

ALWAYS…

PLAY WITH PASSION!

Musically,

Dave
www.PianoAmore.net
www.ProProach.com

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